Oracle

Oracle Code Presentation March 2018

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Last week I was presenting at Oracle Code in New York. I’ve presented at a few Oracle Code events over the past 12 months and it is always interesting to meet and talk with developers from around the World.

The title of my presentation this time was ‘SQL: The one language to rule all your data’.

I’ve given this presentation a few times at different events (POUG, OOW, Oracle Code). I take the contents of this presentation for granted and that most people know these things. But the opposite is true. Well a lot of people do know these things, but a magnitude more do not seem to know.

For example, at last weeks Oracle Code event, I had about 100 people in the room. I started out by asking the attendees ‘How many of you write SQL every day?’. About 90% put up their hand. Then a few minutes later after I start talking about various statistical functions in the database, I then ask them to ‘Count how many statistical functions they have used?’ I then asked them to raise their hands if they use over five statistical functions. About eight people put up their hands. Then I asked how many people use over ten functions. To my surprise only one (yes one) person put up their hand.

The first half of the presentation talks about statistical, analytical and machine learning in the database.

The second half covers some (not all) of the various data types and locations of data that can be accessed from the database.

The presentation then concludes with the title of the presentation about SQL being the one language to rule all your data.

Based on last weeks experience, it looks like a lot more people need to hear it !

Hopefully I’ll get the chance to share this presentation with other events and Oracle User Group conferences.

Two of the key take away messages are:

  • Google makes us stupid
  • We need to RTFM more often

Here is a link to the slides on SlideShare

And I recorded a short video about the presentation with Bob from OTN/ODC.

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Python and Oracle : Fetching records and setting buffer size

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If you used other languages, including Oracle PL/SQL, more than likely you will have experienced having to play buffering the number of records that are returned from a cursor. Typically this is needed when you are processing more than a few hundred records. The default buffering size is relatively small and by increasing the size of the number of records to be buffered can dramatically improve the performance of your code.

As with all things in coding and IT, the phrase “It Depends” applies here and changing the buffering size may not be what you need and my not help you to gain optimal performance for your code.

There are lots and lots of examples of how to test this in PL/SQL and other languages, but what I’m going to show you here in this blog post is to change the buffering size when using Python to process data in an Oracle Database using the Oracle Python library cx_Oracle.

Let us begin with taking the defaults and seeing what happens. In this first scenario the default buffering is used. Here we execute a query and the process the records in a FOR loop (yes these is a row-by-row, slow-by-slow approach.

import time

i = 0
# define a cursor to use with the connection
cur2 = con.cursor()
# execute a query returning the results to the cursor
print("Starting cursor at", time.ctime())
cur2.execute('select * from sh.customers')
print("Finished cursor at", time.ctime())

# for each row returned to the cursor, print the record
print("Starting for loop", time.ctime())
t0 = time.time()
for row in cur2:
    i = i+1
    if (i%10000) == 0:
        print(i,"records processed", time.ctime())

              
t1 = time.time()
print("Finished for loop at", time.ctime())
print("Number of records counted = ", i)

ttime = t1 - t0
print("in ", ttime, "seconds.")

This gives us the following output.

Starting cursor at  10:11:43
Finished cursor at  10:11:43
Starting for loop  10:11:43
10000 records processed  10:11:49
20000 records processed  10:11:54
30000 records processed  10:11:59
40000 records processed  10:12:05
50000 records processed  10:12:09
Finished for loop at  10:12:11 
Number of records counted =  55500
in  28.398550033569336 seconds.

Processing the data this way takes approx. 28 seconds and this corresponds to the buffering of approx 50-75 records at a time. This involves many, many, many round trips to the the database to retrieve this data. This default processing might be fine when our query is only retrieving a small number of records, but as our data set or results set from the query increases so does the time it takes to process the query.

But we have a simple way of reducing the time taken, as the number of records in our results set increases. We can do this by increasing the number of records that are buffered. This can be done by changing the size of the ‘arrysize’ for the cursor definition. This reduces the number of “roundtrips” made to the database, often reducing networks load and reducing the number of context switches on the database server.

The following gives an example of same code with one additional line.

cur2.arraysize = 500

Here is the full code example.

# Test : Change the arraysize and see what impact that has
import time

i = 0
# define a cursor to use with the connection
cur2 = con.cursor()
cur2.arraysize = 500
# execute a query returning the results to the cursor
print("Starting cursor at", time.ctime())
cur2.execute('select * from sh.customers')
print("Finished cursor at", time.ctime())

# for each row returned to the cursor, print the record
print("Starting for loop", time.ctime())
t0 = time.time()
for row in cur2:
    i = i+1
    if (i%10000) == 0:
        print(i,"records processed", time.ctime())

              
t1 = time.time()
print("Finished for loop at", time.ctime())
print("Number of records counted = ", i)

ttime = t1 - t0
print("in ", ttime, "seconds.")

Now the response time to process all the records is.

Starting cursor at 10:13:02
Finished cursor at 10:13:02
Starting for loop 10:13:02
10000 records processed 10:13:04
20000 records processed 10:13:06
30000 records processed 10:13:08
40000 records processed 10:13:10
50000 records processed 10:13:12
Finished for loop at 10:13:13
Number of records counted = 55500
in 11.780734777450562 seconds.

All done in just under 12 seconds, compared to 28 seconds previously.

Here is another alternative way of processing the data and retrieves the entire results set, using the ‘fetchall’ command, and stores it located in ‘res’.

Oracle 18c DBaaS Cloud Setup

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The 18c Oracle DBaaS is now available. This is the only place that Oracle 18c will be available until later in 2018. So if you want to try it out, then you are going to need to get some Oracle Cloud credits, or you may already have a paying account for Oracle Cloud.

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The following outlines the steps you need to go through to gets Oracle 18c setup.

1. Log into your Oracle Cloud

Log into your Oracle Cloud environment. Depending on your access path you will get to your dashboard.

Select Create Instance from the dashboard.

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2. Create a new Database

From the list of services to create, select Database.

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3. Click ‘Create Instance’

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4. Enter the Database Instance details

Enter the details for your new Oracle 18c Database. I’ve called mine ‘db18c’.

Then for the Software Release dropdown list, select ‘Oracle Database 18c’.

Next select the Software Edition from the dropdown list.

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5. Fill in the Instance Details

Fill in the details for ‘DB Name’, ‘PDB Name’, ‘Administration Password’, ‘Confirm Password’, setup the SSH Public Key, and then decide if you need the Backup and Recovery option.

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6. Create the DBaaS

Double check everything and when ready click on the ‘Create’ button.

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7. Wait for Everything to be Create

Now is the time to be patient and wait while your cloud service is created.

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I’ve created two different version of the 18c Oracle DBaaS. The Enterprise Edition to 30 minutes to complete and the High Performance service too 47 minutes.

No it’s time to go play.

18c is now available (but only on the Cloud)

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On Friday afternoon (16th February) we started to see tweets and blog posts from people in Oracle saying that Oracle 18c was now available. But is only available on Oracle Cloud and Engineered Systems.

It looks like we will have to wait until the Autumn before we can install it ourselves on our own servers 😦

Here is the link to the official announcement for Oracle 18c.

Oracle 18c is really Oracle 12.2.0.2. The next full new release of the Oracle database is expected to be Oracle 19.

The new features and incremental enhancements in Oracle 18c are:

  • Multitenant
  • In-Memory
  • Sharding
  • Memory Optimized Fetches
  • Exadata RAC Optimizations
  • High Availability
  • Security
  • Online Partition Merge
  • Improved Machine Learning (OAA)
  • Polymorphic Table Functions
  • Spatial and Graph
  • More JSON improvements
  • Private Temporary Tablespaces
  • New mode for Connection Manager

And now the all important links to the documentation.

Oracle 18c Documentation

Oracle 18c New Features

Oracle 18c Data Warehousing

To give Oracle 18c a try you will need to go to cloud.oracle.com and select Database from the drop down list from the Platform menu. Yes you are going to need an Oracle Cloud account and some money or some free credit. Go and get some free cloud credits at the upcoming Oracle Code events.

If you want a ‘free’ way of trying out Oracle 18c, you can use Oracle Live SQL. They have setup some examples of the new features for you to try.

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NOTE: Oracle 18c is not Autonomous. Check out Tim Hall’s blog posts about this. The Autonomous Oracle Database is something different, and we will be hearing more about this going forward.

Oracle Code Online December 2017

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This week Oracle Code will be having an online event consisting of 5 tracks and with 3 presentations on each track.

This online Oracle Code event will be given in 3 different geographic regions on 12th, 13th and 14th December.

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I’ve been selected to give one of these talks, and I’ve given this talk at some live Oracle Code events and at JavaOne back in October.

The present is pre-recorded and I recorded this video back in September.

I hope to be online at the end of some of these presentations to answer any questions, but unfortunately due to changes with my work commitments I may not be able to be online for all of them.

The moderator for these events will take your questions (or you can send them to me here) and I will write a blog post answering all your questions.

My Oracle Open World 2017 Presentations

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Oracle Open World 2017 will be happening very soon (1st-5th October). Still lots to do before I can get on that plane to San Francisco.

This year I’ll be giving 2 presentations (see table below). One on the Sunday during the User Groups Sunday sessions. I’ve been accepted on the EMEA track. I then get a few days off to enjoy and experience OOW until Thursday when I have my second presentation that is part of JavaOne (I think!)

My OOW kicks off on Friday 29th September with the ACE Director briefing at Oracle HQ, after flying to SFO on Thursday 28th. This year it is only for one day instead of two days. I really enjoy this event as we get to learn and see what Oracle will be announcing at OOW as well as some things that will be coming out during the following few months.

Day Time Presentation Location
Sunday 13:45-14:30 SQL: One Language to Rule All Your Data [OOW SUN1238]

SQL is a very powerful language that has been in use for almost 40 years. SQL comes with many powerful techniques for analyzing your data, and you can analyze data outside the database using SQL as well. Using the new Oracle Big Data SQL it is now possible to analyze data that is stored in a database, in Hadoop, and in NoSQL all at the same time. This session explores the capabilities in Oracle Database that allow you to work with all your data. Discover how SQL really is the unified language for processing all your data, allowing you to analyze, process, run machine learning, and protect all your data.

Hopefully this presentation will be a bit of Fun! For those who have been working with the database for a long time, we can sometimes forget what we can really do. For those starting out in the career may not realise what the database can do. The presentation delivers an important message while having a laugh or two (probably at me).

Marriott Marquis (Golden Gate Level) – Golden Gate C1/C2
Thursday 13:45-14:30 Is SQL the Best Language for Statistics and Machine Learning?

[OOW and JavaOne CON7350]

Did you know that Oracle Database comes with more than 300 statistical functions? And most of these statistical functions are available in all versions of Oracle Database? Most people do not seem to know this. When we hear about people performing statistical analytics, we hear them talking about Excel and R, but what if we could do statistical analysis in the database without having to extract any data onto client machines? This presentation explores the various statistical areas available in Oracle Database and gives several demonstrations. We can also greatly expand our statistical capabilities by using Oracle R Enterprise with the embedded capabilities in SQL.

This presentation is just one of the 14 presentations that are scheduled for the Thursday! I believe this session is already fully booked, but you can still add yourself to the wait list.

Marriott Marquis (Golden Gate Level) – Golden Gate B

My flights and hotel have been paid by OTN as part of the Oracle ACE Director program. Yes this costs a lot of money and there is no way I’d be able to pay these costs. Thank you.

My diary for OOW is really full. No it is completely over booked. It is just mental. Between attending conference session, meeting with various product teams (we only get to meet at OOW), attending various community meet-ups, this year I get to attend some events for OUG leaders (representing UKOUG), spending some time on the EMEA User Group booth, various meetings with people to discuss how they can help or contribute to the UKOUG, then there is Oak Table World, trying to check out the exhibition hall, spend some time at the OTN/ODC hangout area, getting a few OTN t-shirts, doing some book promotions at the Oracle Press shop, etc., etc., etc. I’m exhausted just thinking about it. Mosts days start at 7am and then finish around 10pm.

I’ll need a holiday when I get home! but it will be straight back to work 😦

If you are at OOW and want to chat then contact me via DM on Twitter or WhatsApp (these two are best) or via email (this will be the slowest way).

I’ll have another blog post listing the presentations from various people and partners from the Republic of Ireland who are speaking at OOW.

My Oracle Open World 2017 Presentations

Posted on

Oracle Open World 2017 will be happening very soon (1st-5th October). Still lots to do before I can get on that plane to San Francisco.

This year I’ll be giving 2 presentations (see table below). One on the Sunday during the User Groups Sunday sessions. I’ve been accepted on the EMEA track. I then get a few days off to enjoy and experience OOW until Thursday when I have my second presentation that is part of JavaOne (I think!)

My OOW kicks off on Friday 29th September with the ACE Director briefing at Oracle HQ, after flying to SFO on Thursday 28th. This year it is only for one day instead of two days. I really enjoy this event as we get to learn and see what Oracle will be announcing at OOW as well as some things that will be coming out during the following few months.

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Day Time Presentation Location
Sunday 13:45-14:30 SQL: One Language to Rule All Your Data [OOW SUN1238]

SQL is a very powerful language that has been in use for almost 40 years. SQL comes with many powerful techniques for analyzing your data, and you can analyze data outside the database using SQL as well. Using the new Oracle Big Data SQL it is now possible to analyze data that is stored in a database, in Hadoop, and in NoSQL all at the same time. This session explores the capabilities in Oracle Database that allow you to work with all your data. Discover how SQL really is the unified language for processing all your data, allowing you to analyze, process, run machine learning, and protect all your data.

Hopefully this presentation will be a bit of Fun! For those who have been working with the database for a long time, we can sometimes forget what we can really do. For those starting out in the career may not realise what the database can do. The presentation delivers an important message while having a laugh or two (probably at me).

Marriott Marquis (Golden Gate Level) – Golden Gate C1/C2
Thursday 13:45-14:30 Is SQL the Best Language for Statistics and Machine Learning?

[OOW and JavaOne CON7350]

Did you know that Oracle Database comes with more than 300 statistical functions? And most of these statistical functions are available in all versions of Oracle Database? Most people do not seem to know this. When we hear about people performing statistical analytics, we hear them talking about Excel and R, but what if we could do statistical analysis in the database without having to extract any data onto client machines? This presentation explores the various statistical areas available in Oracle Database and gives several demonstrations. We can also greatly expand our statistical capabilities by using Oracle R Enterprise with the embedded capabilities in SQL.

This presentation is just one of the 14 presentations that are scheduled for the Thursday! I believe this session is already fully booked, but you can still add yourself to the wait list.

Marriott Marquis (Golden Gate Level) – Golden Gate C3

My flights and hotel have been paid by OTN as part of the Oracle ACE Director program. Yes this costs a lot of money and there is no way I’d be able to pay these costs. Thank you.

My diary for OOW is really full. No it is completely over booked. It is just mental. Between attending conference session, meeting with various product teams (we only get to meet at OOW), attending various community meet-ups, this year I get to attend some events for OUG leaders (representing UKOUG), spending some time on the EMEA User Group booth, various meetings with people to discuss how they can help or contribute to the UKOUG, then there is Oak Table World, trying to check out the exhibition hall, spend some time at the OTN/ODC hangout area, getting a few OTN t-shirts, doing some book promotions at the Oracle Press shop, etc., etc., etc. I’m exhausted just thinking about it. Mosts days start at 7am and then finish around 10pm.

I’ll need a holiday when I get home! but it will be straight back to work 😦

If you are at OOW and want to chat then contact me via DM on Twitter or WhatsApp (these two are best) or via email (this will be the slowest way).

I’ll have another blog post listing the presentations from various people and partners from the Republic of Ireland who are speaking at OOW.